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Posts Tagged ‘US Congress’

The Washington Post, By Rajiv Chandrasekaran

29 April, 2011

U.S. aid officials have been forced to delay three large development programs intended to support the American military strategy in southern Afghanistan at a critical, make-or-break moment in the war.

The initiatives, which are supposed to support local governments, agricultural development and job-training efforts, have been held up by bureaucratic missteps and funding cuts by Congress, according to senior U.S. officials. As a result, the programs will not begin until much of the summer fighting season has concluded. (more…)

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By: Lukas I. Alpert

March 31, 2011

At least 40 civilians have been killed in NATO air strikes on Tripoli, the Vatican’s top envoy to Libya said Thursday.

“They are killing dozens of civilians,” said Bishop Giovanni Innocenzo Martinelli. “In the Tajoura neighborhood, around 40 civilians were killed, and a house with a family inside collapsed.”

“In the Buslim neighborhood, due to bombardments, a civilian building came down, although it is not clear how many people were inside.”

Martinelli said that he had not seen any casualties himself, but was relying on reports from “contacts” among Tripoli’s residents. (more…)

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By: Stephen Zunes

March 28, 2011

Reasonable people can disagree on the appropriateness of the decision by the United States and its NATO allies to attack Libya in the wake of the Gadaffi regime’s offensive against rebel-held cities under the doctrine of “the responsibility to protect.” Though the intervention likely prevented a slaughter, there is no guarantee that it won’t simply protract a bloody military stalemate that could result in at least as many civilian deaths. (more…)

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Date: March 24, 2011

ISLAMABAD: President Asif Ali Zardari condemned US drone strikes on Thursday and clarified to the Obama Administration that the US will have to end drone strikes in tribal regions. (more…)

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Wednesday 10 June 2009

This analysis is written by Samina Ahmed, director of the South Asia Program at the International Crisis Group

When President Barack Obama’s special representative for Afghanistan and Pakistan announced an additional $200 million in US assistance for internally displaced persons from Swat, it surely gave some a bit of a political respite for Pakistan’s young civilian government. Faced with three million new domestic refugees as a result of its military action to oust the Taliban from Malakand District, Islamabad could only welcome Richard Holbrooke’s pledge. (more…)

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