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Posts Tagged ‘Targeted deaths’

Der Speigel | Der Spiegel Staff |  June 22, 2011

In the Syrian city of Ariha, the cherry trees are covered with deep red fruit. It is harvest time and the cherries are sweet, but no one comes to pick them. Two weeks ago, after the regime’s elite troops had transformed peaceful demonstrations in the nearby provincial capital Idlib into bloodbaths, two young men tried to save the cherry harvest. They loaded their small truck full of cherries and took off for the port  city of Latakia in western Syria. They didn’t make it very far. A military patrol stopped the two men in front of a sugar refinery and shot them dead.

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By  BBC News

A prominent Afghan tribal leader who spoke of his fears of assassination by the Taliban has been killed near the southern city of Kandahar.

Unidentified gunmen shot Abdul Rahman in the head as he was walking home. (more…)

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By Nick Meo, Associated Press

The United Nations said around 90 people including many children had died in the attack last August in Herat Province when several houses were destroyed by bombs intended for a Taliban commander. The United States military said 33 civilians and 22 militants died.

Its spokesmen had initially insisted that the targeted commander had been killed but he later turned up alive. The military were finally forced to admit that most of the victims had been non-combatants. (more…)

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By JASON STRAZIUSO, Associated Press Writer

KABUL – An operation the American military at first described as a “precision strike” instead killed 13 Afghan civilians and only three militants, the U.S. said Saturday, three days after sending a general to the site to investigate.

Civilian casualties have been a huge source of friction between the U.S. and Afghan President Hamid Karzai, who has stepped up demands that U.S. and NATO operations kill no civilians and that Afghan soldiers take part in missions to help prevent unwanted deaths. (more…)

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