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Archive for the ‘Laws, Trials’ Category

Owen Bowcott | The Guardian | July 7, 2011

Britain was an occupying power after the invasion of Iraq and failed to carry out effective investigations into the killing of civilians, the European court of human rights has ruled.

The decision by the Strasbourg court could open the Ministry of Defence to a deluge of claims and add to the pressure for further public inquiries into the behaviour of troops in and around Basra after the 2003 invasion.

By extending liability beyond the UK’s territorial limits and outside Europe, the ruling will have far-reaching implications for military operations around the world.

The case was brought by the Birmingham-based firm Public Interest Lawyers on behalf of Iraqis who claimed their relatives had been variously shot dead, raped, disappeared or tortured by British soldiers between 2003 and 2006.

(more…)

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CNN | June 28, 2011

The International Criminal Court is still trying to link Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi, his son and his brother-in-law to rapes, but it does not yet have enough evidence to do so, prosecutor Luis Moreno-Ocampo said Tuesday.

It has evidence that rapes have taken place in Libya’s civil war, he said, but he cannot prove Gadhafi ordered them. (more…)

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New York Times | Marlise Simons | June 27, 2011

PARIS — The International Criminal Court in The Hague issued arrest warrants on Monday for Libyan leader Col. Muammar el-Qaddafi, one of his sons and his intelligence chief, accusing them of crimes against humanity during the first two weeks of the uprising in Libya that led to a NATO bombing campaign.

The decision had been expected since the chief prosecutor announced in May that he was seeking judges orders for the men’s arrest. (more…)

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Reuters | June 9, 2011

UNITED NATIONS – International Criminal Court investigators have evidence linking Libyan leader Muammar Gaddafi to a policy of raping opponents and may bring separate charges on the issue, the ICC prosecutor said on Wednesday.

Prosecutor Luis Moreno-Ocampo requested arrest warrants on May 16 against Gaddafi, his son Saif al-Islam and the country’s spy chief on charges of crimes against humanity committed during attempts to crush the country’s rebellion. (more…)

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Huffington Post Blog | Ignacio “Iggy” Balderas | May 24, 2011

The failure to establish effective accountability over private security contractors (PSCs) hasn’t just obscured important truths about how our nation secures its foreign policy — it has allowed some reckless actors to repeatedly endanger this goal.

We now have a chance to firmly lay down the rules, punish violators and allow the professional PSCs who make me proud every day do the jobs they’re trained to do. This is why I support The Civilian Extraterritorial Jurisdiction Act (CEJA), which will be reintroduced soon by Sen. Patrick Leahy, D-VT. The bill was originally introduced last year and goes further than the current law in holding contractors accountable and plugs potential legal loopholes that bad actors may take advantage of. (more…)

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The Guardian | Robert Booth | May 23, 2011

The father of a 13-year-old Iraqi boy who has been missing since 2003 after being treated in a British military hospital has begun legal action against the Ministry of Defence demanding compensation and a public inquiry. (more…)

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AFP

20 May, 2011

SYDNEY (AFP) – Two Australian soldiers charged over the deaths of six civilians, including children, during a military raid in Afghanistan will not have to face a court martial, a judge advocate ruled Friday. (more…)

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