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Archive for the ‘Journalists’ Category

By Joseph Krauss

April 6, 2011

NEAR BREGA, (AFP) – Rebel soldiers erected a checkpoint at the gate of the eastern Libyan town of Ajdabiya on Wednesday to prevent a convoy of eager but mostly unarmed civilians from reaching the front.

The soldiers, defectors from Moamer Kadhafi’s army, said they had orders to impose discipline on the hastily-assembled rebel forces a day after they were driven several kilometres (miles) back by loyalist artillery.

“We are stopping the youth who show up with guns,” said Sherif Mohammed, as he pulled a dented metal barricade across the road. “What are they going to do against shelling?” (more…)

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By: David French

April 3, 2011

Imagine—if you can—the following scene:

It’s midnight, and the desert sky glows orange from the flames of the burning Humvee. Your best friend is still in there, trapped. Or at least you think he is. You can’t be sure because the burning vehicle is behind you. All of your attention is focused ahead, 200 meters to the north, where six figures crouch in an irrigation ditch. Are they hostile? Why would six people be hiding in an irrigation ditch at midnight? Are they waiting to shoot down the medevac chopper that’s on its way to—you hope, you pray—save your friend’s life?

You see movement, and you call for permission to fire.

Thirty kilometers away, the scene is very different. In a busy tactical operations center, all eyes are fixed on a grainy, flickering, black-and-white image. The UAV feed keeps fading—it’s hardly as clear as the images you saw on the news before your deployment—but you can see the Humvee aflame, the frantic efforts to free the trapped soldier (Who is it? Do you know him?), and you can also see—when the camera pans north—six ghostly figures lying down in an irrigation ditch, in a perfect position to ambush the medevac helicopter.

But you don’t see any weapons. At least not clearly. The screen flickers again. You can’t be sure. (more…)

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By: Lukas I. Alpert

March 31, 2011

At least 40 civilians have been killed in NATO air strikes on Tripoli, the Vatican’s top envoy to Libya said Thursday.

“They are killing dozens of civilians,” said Bishop Giovanni Innocenzo Martinelli. “In the Tajoura neighborhood, around 40 civilians were killed, and a house with a family inside collapsed.”

“In the Buslim neighborhood, due to bombardments, a civilian building came down, although it is not clear how many people were inside.”

Martinelli said that he had not seen any casualties himself, but was relying on reports from “contacts” among Tripoli’s residents. (more…)

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By HADEEL AL-SHALCHI

March 30, 2011

KHORUM, Libya — The grieving mother sat on the ground rocking her 2-month old daughter under a blanket on her lap, crying softly and accepting the soft words of condolences from neighbors.

Nizha Abdel-Salam and her family say her 18-month old son Sirajuddin al-Sweisi was killed when debris pierced the wall of their home as NATO airstrikes hit an ammunition near their village of Khorum early Tuesday morning. (more…)

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By: Julius Cavendish

March 25, 2011

Civilians have long borne the brunt of the fighting in Afghanistan, though incidents where they have been deliberately targeted by Nato troops are rare.

The fact that the murders allegedly committed by the “kill squad” came to light precisely because the US military had launched its own investigation – which was picked up by the press not in Afghanistan, but in the US, where the courts martial were to take place – show that the way it self-regulates and disciplines its personnel can work at critical junctures. (more…)

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By: Michel Gabaudan

March 24, 2011

It is said that people during times of conflict vote with their feet. As such, monitoring the movement of people is often a good barometer of the nature of that conflict. However, the images of people fleeing Libya into Egypt and Tunisia do not show us the whole story of the war that is unfolding. (more…)

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A Global Post report last week found that not only did recent US airstrikes in Kunar province, Afghanistan, kill as many as 67 civilians, but also that some journalists were prevented from investigating what happened. Jean MacKenzie reported that two Al Jazeera reporters were detained and interrogated by the US military for covering the incident. (more…)

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